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Assessing the Correlations Among Cognitive Overload, Online Course Design and Student Self-efficacy PROCEEDINGS

, , Arkansas Tech University, United States

AACE Award

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Austin, Texas, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-92-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Online learning materials based on the cognitive theory of multimedia learning improves student-learning outcomes. A relationship between course design, cognitive overload and self-efficacy in the online environment has not been documented. This study examined the effect of online learning material designs on students’ cognitive load and self-efficacy. Course designs (with and without segmentation), self-efficacy and the perceived difficulty of the content were examined. Participants perceived segmented content as less difficult than non-segmented content. The results also indicated that the perceived difficulty of the learning materials reported by students in the segmented module condition does not correlate with their perceived self-efficacy. However, there was a strong, positive correlation between students’ perceived self-efficacy and course design. These findings support segmentation as a design technique to increase learners’ level of confidence in completing learning tasks.

Citation

AACE Award Ibrahim, M. & Callaway, R. (2012). Assessing the Correlations Among Cognitive Overload, Online Course Design and Student Self-efficacy. In P. Resta (Ed.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2012 (pp. 463-470). Chesapeake, VA: AACE.

OpenURL


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