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What ICT-related skills and capabilities should be considered central to the definition of digital literacy? PROCEEDINGS

, Australian Catholic University, Australia

EdMedia: World Conference on Educational Media and Technology, in Lisbon, Portugal ISBN 978-1-880094-89-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE)

Abstract

In the 21st century, when talk of digital literacy arises, we think of tools that have become an extension of ourselves and provide us with the ability to download music, capture video, and edit media to socially construct meaning of the world. The evolving landscape of Web 2.0 tools and the taxonomy of social networks are now available are central in shaping our idea of communicating, participating and sharing knowledge in the global age. Traditional media literacy is about what we consume, read, or download. However, new communications media require new forms of digital, cultural and communicative competence. In the age of participatory Web of social and creative networking we also need social media literacy, information literacy and a range of associated ICT skills to enable us to access, use, create and share digital resources. The variety of terms now used to describe e-literacy or digital literacy are a reflection of the importance of understanding the competencies needed in the digital environment and the need for digital flexibility.

Citation

McLoughlin, C. (2011). What ICT-related skills and capabilities should be considered central to the definition of digital literacy?. In T. Bastiaens & M. Ebner (Eds.), Proceedings of EdMedia: World Conference on Educational Media and Technology 2011 (pp. 471-475). Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE).

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