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Games and Motivation to Learn Science: Personal Identity, Applicability, Relevance and Meaningfulness Article

, Michigan State University, United States

Journal of Interactive Learning Research Volume 19, Number 4, ISSN 1093-023X Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Game-based learning and designing has become a hot topic in educational technology. It is believed that video gaming is one way to get students engaged in learning complex and ill-structured material, holistic learning, and preparing learners for 21st century jobs. However, beyond engagement, games may also be used for learning and developing personal interest in science by utilizing the affordances for personal identity, applicability beyond the school setting and for a personal agenda, and relevance and meaningfulness of scientific practices and ideas. This article, based on the synthesis of information from the games, science education, and motivational research literatures present a focused view on how games for learning (serious games) can be designed and used for learning and developing an interest in science. The article also points in the direction of much needed research to assess the claims about games for learning.

Citation

Foster, A. (2008). Games and Motivation to Learn Science: Personal Identity, Applicability, Relevance and Meaningfulness. Journal of Interactive Learning Research, 19(4), 597-614. Chesapeake, VA: AACE.

Keywords


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