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How Exemplary Computer-Using Teachers Differ From Other Teachers: Implications for Realizing the Potential of Computers in Schools Article

, University of California

CITE Journal Volume 1, Number 2, ISSN 1528-5804 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE)

Abstract

In a recent study of teachers who had reputations as being expert computer users, researchers at the Bank Street College of Education identified teachers who used computer software to provide intellectually exciting educational experiences (Sheingold & Hadley, 1990; Hadley & Sheingold, 1993). In the Bank Street study, the exemplary practitioners directly addressed curriculum goals by having students use a wide variety of computer software, including simulations, programming languages, spreadsheets, database programs, graphing programs, logic and problem-solving programs, writing tools, and electronic bulletin-board communications software. Over time and with experience, the teachers became enthusiastic about seeing their students exploit intellectual tools for writing, analyzing data, and solving problems; and they became more comfortable and confident about using computers themselves. Sheingold and Hadley (1990) provided a portrait of computer use that other teachers might aspire to and attain in their own teaching practice.

Citation

Becker, H.J. (2000). How Exemplary Computer-Using Teachers Differ From Other Teachers: Implications for Realizing the Potential of Computers in Schools. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 1(2), 274-293. Charlottesville, VA: AACE.

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